My Favorite Sources for Book Recommendations

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

Last week, one of my colleagues asked me how I find and decide what library books to get. Her question made me think not just about work but my personal reading life too.

Sometimes I’m baffled by the idea that certain readers struggle to find their next book. I feel as if I’m drowning in books some days, so the thought of someone not knowing what to read next is hard for me to wrap my head around.

Those thoughts sparked the idea behind today’s post, which is a list of my favorite book recommendation sources. I include sources I use for school libraries and my own reading. I hope this is helpful and that you find a new-to-you resource. Let’s jump in!

Photo by Pauline Loroy on Unsplash

Any New Books

I’ve been a longtime subscriber of Any New Books newsletters. Each week, I get emails listing that week’s most popular book releases. You can sign up for whatever genres interest you most. I receive lists for teens, fiction, nonfiction, biographies, history, and spirituality. These newsletters are an excellent resource, especially if you’re doing work that requires you to pay attention to the latest book releases.

Book Marks

Book Marks is a site from Lit Hub, another tremendous literary resource. On Book Marks, readers see aggregated book reviews for the newest releases. I get an email from the site every Friday that shows me the top-reviewed fiction and nonfiction releases of the week. I always find at least one title on either list to add to my “to be read” list (as if that needs to get any longer).

Book Riot

Book Riot is one of my favorite sources for teen book lists and recommendations. They have book lists for every topic you could imagine. Book Riot shares the latest books but also highlights backlist titles, which is helpful for me to make sure I haven’t missed any big YA releases.

Instagram

One of the good things about social media is the celebration and attention its users give to books. Readers can find photos, videos, and recommendations for niche interests with just a couple of clicks. Here are some of my favorite literary Instagram accounts:

The Millions

Twice a year (January and July), The Millions shares its most anticipated books preview. I look forward to these lists because I always end up with a ton of recommendations. The Millions focuses primarily on literary fiction and narrative nonfiction, both of which I love. The site also offers book lists and well-written essays.

Modern Mrs. Darcy

Anne Bogel is probably the most famous book blogger out there. (She also hosts the delightful podcast, What Should I Read Next.) On Modern Mrs. Darcy, a blog I’ve followed for many years, Anne shares all kinds of bookish goodness. Her summer reading guides are always packed with exciting titles, and I also love her book lists

My Local Indie

There are few things in this world I love more than a bookstore, and I’m lucky to have some good ones in my city. Auntie’s Bookstore is my favorite and the one where I shop the most. Their inventory includes titles and authors I’ve never heard about before, which makes shopping at Auntie’s extra exciting. I always make sure to stop by their staff picks section on each trip. Auntie’s also has an excellent Instagram account. Each Tuesday, they show off the newest arrivals for adults, teens, and kids. These photos help me remember which books I want to read and which ones I should get for my school libraries.

NoveList

NoveList is a subscription database you might have access to through your local public library. It’s like the best bookish search engine out there. You can search for titles by unique genres, story elements, author characteristics, etc. I use NoveList to search for the latest YA releases. I can see when a book was published, read multiple reviews of it, and save it to a list so I’ll remember to purchase it. During last year’s remote learning, I led a virtual training for my coworkers on using NoveList because I love it so much.

Social Justice Books

Last school year, I completed diversity audits of the high school libraries where I work. This was the same year when my school district passed an equity resolution, promising to provide a more inclusive learning environment for all students. As I searched for diverse books to help support that resolution, Social Justice Books was a site I turned to repeatedly. They have all kinds of book lists and sort titles by grade level, making it quick and easy to find books for teens.

Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

YALSA is the best resource for finding good YA titles. They have much to offer, including book lists, book awards, quick picks for reluctant readers, and helpful articles. It doesn’t hurt that their acronym sounds like “salsa,” one of my favorite things in the entire world.


What sites should I add to my list? Where do you get book recommendations? Let me know!

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