What I Read and Loved in July 2020

Photo by Corey Agopian on Unsplash

Despite the stress and mental exhaustion from living during a global pandemic, July went by quickly. I’m not sure how that happened, but I’m more than okay with it. I celebrated my birthday, my mother’s birthday, and my grandmother’s 96th birthday. I also watched Hamilton (along with everyone else, I think), and it blew me away and basically turned me into a new peron. More on that later. 

Because of the aforementioned stress and mental exhaustion, I preferred television and music to books throughout July, though I did finish four titles (and am in the middle of reading this one). But before I talk about that stuff, let’s talk about the books!

What I Read

Bring me back book cover

Bring Me Back by B. A. Paris

Finn and Layla are driving home from vacation when they stop at a service station. Finn gets out of the car to use the restroom, and when he returns, Layla has vanished for good. Ten years later, Finn has moved on and has fallen in love with Layla’s sister, Ellen. They’re engaged, and once they made that news public, things from Layla’s past started showing up, including clues that Layla herself might be alive and closer than they think. 

(MILD SPOILERS AHEAD!)

Though there’s a lack of character development, Bring Me Back is gripping and held my attention, and that’s where my compliments end. The ridiculously unbelievable ending ruined this entire book for me and made me wish I hadn’t read it. I can’t remember another conclusion that I hated as much as I hated this one. I wanted to throw this book across the room, go pick it up, set it on fire, and then bury its ashes in the backyard. Since it was a library book, I opted to return it instead. If you’ve read this, what did you think of the ending?

Dear Martin book cover

Dear Martin by Nic Stone

Justyce is a Black teen with a bright future ahead. He attends an elite school and is bound for an Ivy League college. When Justyce goes to help an ex-girlfriend who’s intoxicated, the police approach and assume Justyce is trying to steal her car. He’s handcuffed for hours. This incident brings to the surface issues like police brutality, racism, and belonging that Justcye tries to process by writing letters to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Dear Martin is a slim YA book that I read in one day. Nic Stone has so much to offer her readers in its pages. Justyce is a compelling, profoundly sympathetic lead character whose questions are more timely now than ever. This novel is one I would hand to any teen who likes realistic fiction, and I think it would be especially great for reluctant readers. 

Home before dark book cover

Home Before Dark by Riley Sager

Maggie is the daughter of Ewan Holt, the author of the bestselling book House of Horrors in which he tells what he claims is the true story of the few days his family spent living in Baneberry Hall. Ewan’s book recounts the strange and spooky events that led his family to leave the house behind in the middle of the night, without possessions or looking back. Maggie feels as if this book has defined her life, and she hates it. 

When Ewan dies, Maggie realizes he never sold Baneberry Hall. She has a business in which she restores old homes, so Maggie heads to the property to fix it up and maybe even get some answers for what she knows are her father’s lies. When strange things start happening, Maggie wonders if House of Horrors contains more truth than she thought. 

Riley Sager is one of my favorite contemporary writers. His thrillers are consistently addictive, and Home Before Dark is no different. The novel is a book within a book; chapters alternate between Maggie’s point of view and passages from House of Horrors. I almost had to put this book in the freezer, so I think this novel creeps closer to horror than any of Sager’s previous work (except for maybe Final Girls). If you’re a Sager fan or just need a good thriller to keep you occupied, don’t miss this one.

The Dilemma by B. A. Paris

Even though I was still angry at B. A. Paris for Bring Her Back, I couldn’t say no to this title when OverDrive told me my library hold was available. One of the reasons I couldn’t say no was because my Kindle was right next to me, and I didn’t want to get up to grab anything else. Anyway. 

The Dilemma revolves around Livia and Adam, a happily married couple with two adult children. Livia is about to turn 40, and she’s throwing herself the lavish birthday party she’s been dreaming of and planning since her 20s. There’s a secret Livia knows about, though, that’s weighing on her. And on the day of her party, Adam is carrying a secret of his own that might change everything. 

I knew nothing about this book going in, and that was for the best. The Dilemma is more of a family drama than a thriller like Paris’s other books, yet I still found myself getting nervous and holding my breath in certain parts. If you need a good escapist read, I think this novel will be just the thing. I couldn’t put it down and have forgiven B. A. Paris.

What I Loved

MOVIE/THEATER: Hamilton

I’ve wanted to see Hamilton as long as I’ve known about it. When I found out it would be streaming on Disney+, I heard choruses of angels singing as glee filled my heart. Despite that, I tried to keep my expectations reasonable. I thought there was no chance that Hamilton could live up to the hype. I’m thrilled to say I was wrong. These words will probably sound hyperbolic, but watching Hamilton was one of the most profound and moving experiences I’ve ever had with a piece of art. I was in awe from the first second to the final gasp.

MUSIC: Folklore, Taylor Swift

God bless Taylor Swift for making the album I didn’t know I needed. I’ve listened to Folklore on repeat since its surprise release and find it incredibly soothing, fascinating, and lovely. My heart has a soft spot for 1989, but I think Folklore might be Swift’s best work yet. 

MOVIE: Palm Springs (Streaming on Hulu)

Palm Springs is a surprisingly sweet and funny romcom starring Andy Samberg (Nyles) and Cristin Milioti (Sarah). Nyles, a guest at a wedding, finds himself in a time loop in which he experiences the wedding day over and over again. He’s drawn to Sarah, the maid of honor, and wonders what forever might look like with her. I enjoyed this film immensely.

MOVIE: Troop Zero (Streaming on Amazon Prime)

Troop Zero is such a sweet little gem of a movie. McKenna Grace plays a girl who’s lost her mother and is obsessed with outer space. When she hears about an opportunity for Birdie Scouts to record their voice on NASA’s Golden Record, nothing will stop her from taking her shot (Hamilton reference for the win!). The film also stars Viola Davis, Allison Janney, and Jim Gaffigan. Its cast and earnestness make Troop Zero a delight.

The baby-sitters club poster

TELEVISION: The Baby-Sitters Club (Streaming on Netflix)

I was unprepared for how much I was going to love this show. I was obsessed with The Baby-Sitters Club as a kid and would read any of the books I could get my hands on. (I still have my collection because I can’t bear to part with it.) I knew the characters as well as I knew myself. Thankfully, this new show keeps all the characteristics of my beloved babysitters yet modernizes them and the books’ plots for today’s audience. I’m eagerly awaiting season two. 


That’s it for me. What did you read and love in July?

What I Read and Loved in June 2020

Photo by Aneta Pawlik on Unsplash

It’s officially summer, and I’m on break from my school job until late August. I like my summers to be as plan-free as possible, which works out great for me this year. My birthday is next week, so my biggest dilemma this week is deciding what dessert I want. Even though I feel like the world around me is on fire right now, I have much for which to be grateful. Gratitude makes everything more bearable.

And now for what I read and loved in June! It was a great reading month, so I’m excited to share what books I finished.

What I Read

Queenie book cover

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Queenie is a 25-year-old Jamaican Brit living in London. She’s reeling from a recent breakup with the love of her life who said he needed space. His lack of communication is breaking Queenie’s heart, so she looks for love elsewhere with men who don’t treat her as they should. Her work life is as messy as her dating life. Queenie works for a newspaper but is doing subpar work in which she quickly gets distracted. She longs for true love and to be a great journalist who covers essential issues, but she can’t quite get there. I was rooting for her through every step of her journey. This novel has some lighthearted moments, but it also has important things to say about friendship, love, and mental health.

White rage book cover

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
by Carol Anderson

My desire to read diversely has grown stronger over the past few weeks, thanks to the Black Lives Matter movement. It’s been wonderful to see the New York Times bestseller list full of titles by Black authors. One of the books I knew I wanted to read was White Rage. In it, Carol Anderson explores Black history from the Civil War to the present day. There was so much information in this book that was new to me. I learned a great deal about what life was really like for Blacks post-Civil War, and how colossal the battle was against ending segregated schools. White Rage is a slim book but is packed full of insight. It’s a must-read book I know I’ll turn to again and again. 

Rodham book cover

Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld

I love history but have little interest in alternative history. I’d heard a lot of buzz about Rodham, though, so I decided to check it out to see if the buzz was valid. I started the book expecting to dislike it, but instead, I could hardly put it down. As you might have guessed from the title, Rodham tells the story of what might have happened to Hillary Clinton if she hadn’t married Bill. This book contains so many things I love: a strong protagonist, juicy politics, fascinating real-life history, and sweet female friendship. If you’re on the fence about this book like I was, give it a shot and let it surprise you. 

Pizza Girl by Jean Kyoung Frazier

Pizza Girl had been on my TBR since January, so I was thrilled when it was finally released last month. It’s about an 18-year-old girl who has just finished high school. She’s pregnant and is living with her mom and boyfriend. Both of them love and support her, but she’s not quite sure what to do with their affection. Her father has died, and though his alcoholism made their relationship weak, she’s still feeling the effects of his death. One day a woman named Jenny calls the pizza place where our heroine works and requests a pie with pepperoni and pickles, the only thing her son will eat. Pizza girl heads to the woman’s house with her order and becomes immediately captivated by Jenny. I appreciate what Pizza Girl is trying to do, but I wish it had more depth. The relationship between Jenny and the pizza girl is fascinating, yet it left me with a lot of questions, too. I like this book and think it’s worth reading but wanted more from it. If you like offbeat stories and appreciate writers like Ottessa Moshfegh and Halle Butler, you’ll probably enjoy this debut.

How to be an antiracist book cover

How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

Antiracism is a new concept for me. I’ve learned there’s a difference between being someone who isn’t racist and someone who is actively antiracist. The latter is what matters and is what Ibram X. Kendi explores throughout his book. I appreciate the style in which Kendi writes. He links chapters together and shares his own story alongside thoughts from Black scholars. How to Be an Antiracist contains chapters focused on a single idea, such as biology, success, color, and survival. Kendi is a professor, and it’s evident from his writing that he’s an outstanding teacher. I learned a lot and would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about what it means to live as an antiracist. 

What I Loved

Page 1 books logo

Page 1 Book Subscription

Page 1 recently offered a sale on their monthly book subscription service. I love books, sales, and getting mail, so I quickly subscribed. (I’d subscribed before and only quit because I was out of room for more books. That’s still true, but now the world is falling apart, and I no longer care about that small detail.) What I love about this subscription is that it’s a surprise. You tell Page 1 some of your literary likes and dislikes, and they choose books based on your preferences. I got my first box last month but had already read the book they sent. Thanks to their 100% satisfaction guarantee, I told them I’d already read the book, and they sent another, allowing me to keep the first book. This subscription is fun, and it supports an indie bookstore with fantastic customer service. Check it out.

Flippy Tablet Pillow

I just bought myself a new iPad as an early birthday gift. (I can’t be the only person who buys themselves presents, right?) I wanted my time with my new toy to be as enjoyable as possible, which meant I needed to get a Flippy. And so I did! I heard of this from the oh-so-wonderful Instagram account Things I Bought and Liked. The Flippy makes using my iPad more convenient and comfortable. It’s excellent for sitting down and reading, and also good for using in the kitchen when I have a recipe on my iPad. I also like using the Flippy with my Kindle. Is this thing a tad extra? It sure is, but I have no regrets.

A picture of Taylor Swift

This Is Taylor Swift Spotify Playlist

I’ve tried to listen to new music this year, but when I’m stressed, I want to listen to something I already know and enjoy. Enter this Taylor Swift playlist. I’ve had this on constant repeat for the past few weeks. It’s been with me at work, in my car, and at home. I just love Taylor so much, you guys. Pretentious teen Andrea never would have admitted such a thing, but here we are.


What did you read and love in June? I’d love to hear!

What I Read and Loved in May 2020

Photo by Elena Kloppenburg on Unsplash

Despite the chaos in the world, May went by quickly. I started going back into my school libraries for a few hours a week and liked the sense of normalcy that provided.

In another act of normalcy, I put together some book lists, one of my favorite things to do. I shared two blog posts featuring Black Lives Matter reading options. Here’s the one for adults, and here’s the one for kids and teens.

Now let’s get to what I read and loved in May.

What I Read

Her every fear book cover

Her Every Fear by Peter Swanson

Her Every Fear focuses on Kate, a Londoner who swaps apartments with her American cousin Corbin. They’ve never met, but the opportunity is too good for Kate to pass up. Kate heads to Boston and hopes to gain back some of the peace and independence she had before a former boyfriend kidnapped her and nearly killed her. Trouble follows Kate, though, when one of her new neighbors is found dead. Corbin quickly becomes a person of interest in the case, and Kate slowly learns that he’s not the person she thought he was. Peter Swanson has become one of my go-to thriller writers. His books are consistently gripping with exciting twists. Her Every Fear is no different. 

Behind closed doors book cover

Behind Closed Doors by B. A. Paris

This novel centers on Jack and Grace, a seemingly perfect newlywed couple. Everything about them is impressive, including their home and appearances. What looks ideal from the outside is anything but on the inside, though. I typically love domestic thrillers involving a tumultuous marriage, but this one didn’t work for me. The plot seems too unbelievable, even for a thriller. I kept wanting to roll my eyes and toss the book across the room. It was entertaining, so if that’s all you’re looking for, this book will do, but if you’re looking for more, you won’t find it here.

Team of five book cover

Team of Five: The Presidents Club in the Age of Trump
by Kate Andersen Brower

Here’s a list of things I love:

  1. Air conditioning
  2. Iced coffee
  3. Books about presidents
  4. Books about presidents and their relationships with other presidents

Brower starts off her book in the Oval Office, where she’s interviewing President Trump. She allows him an opportunity to relate to and empathize with former presidents, but he doesn’t take it. His break from the so-called presidents club sets the tone for this book about the relationships between Carter, Bush 41, Clinton, Bush 43, Obama, and Trump. Brower explores the tensions and friendships between these men in the light of our volatile political climate If you’re a presidential history nerd like I am, you’ll enjoy this entertaining glimpse into the lives of America’s leaders.

Behind her eyes book cover

Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough

All I knew about Behind Her Eyes going in was that it has a shocking ending. I can verify that it does, but the stuff before the conclusion is pretty good, too. The story revolves around Louise, a single mom struggling to find her place in the world post-divorce. She meets a man in a bar named David, and they kiss, filling her with hope and desire. He turns out to be her new boss, though, and the new friend she just met is his wife, Adele. As the story progresses, Louise gets more and more involved with both David and Adele. As in every thriller ever, things are much more complicated than they seem and everyone has secrets. My attention span has been pretty short these past few weeks, but this book was the perfect choice to hold my attention.

What I Loved

Dead to me poster

TELEVISION: Dead to Me

To quote the youths, I can’t even with this show. I haven’t watched anything this addictive in a long time. If you’re unfamiliar, Dead to Me is a series about two women who become friends after meeting at a grief support group. Christina Applegate and Linda Cardellini are fantastic leads who excel at both drama and comedy. I think the less you know about the show going in, the better off you’ll be. There are twists and turns in nearly every episode, so make sure you have lots of time on your hands when you start this series because won’t want to stop. 

PBS American Experience logo with the American flag

DOCUMENTARY: American Experience: George W. Bush

As I’ve already established in this post, I love presidential history. I was excited to see a new documentary in the American Experience series, especially because it’s about George W. Bush. I was in high school when the US invaded Iraq, so I knew what was going on, but had no depth of knowledge to understand everything fully. This documentary did what I hoped it would do; I learned a lot about not just Iraq, but about what led to the September 11th attacks, how that crisis unfolded, and how it changed the entirety of Bush’s presidency. If you have even the slightest interest in presidents or American history, make sure to check this out.


What did you love in May? I’d love to hear!

What I Read and Loved in March 2020

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

March was certainly a chaotic month, and April promises more of the same. I always strive to be a grateful person, but more than ever, I’m thankful for things I usually take for granted, like having enough food to eat, a home where I’m safe, and a job that continues to support me as I work from home.

I’m also grateful for books and the escape they provide in times of stress. Keep on reading to see what books I devoured last month (and for a lengthy list of other things that have helped keep me sane).

What I Read

Here for it book cover

Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America by R. Eric Thomas

I was unfamiliar with R. Eric Thomas before I read this book, and now I want to be his best friend. He writes a humor column for Elle, which, according to the site, “skewers politics, pop culture, celebrity shade, and schadenfreude.” Here for It is so funny that it made me laugh out loud several times, but Thomas also knows how to be serious, like in the essay where he talks about a friend’s death. If you enjoy writers like David Sedaris and Sloane Crosley, don’t miss this gem of a debut.

The girls in the garden book cover

The Girls in the Garden by Lisa Jewell

Everything I love about Lisa Jewell’s books is present in The Girls in the Garden: a lush English setting, characters whose lives intersect in surprising ways, and the perfect amount of suspense. The setting for this book is an urban London neighborhood where the houses share a communal park that serves as their backyard. One night after a neighborhood party has ended, a teen girl is found battered and half-naked in the grass. As the book progresses, readers learn more about who she is and who might have left her for dead. If you’re looking for a great page-turner, this is it.

My dark Vanessa book cover

My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell

If you’re sensitive to stories of abuse, it’s probably best to skip this one.

When we meet Vanessa Wye, she’s a grown woman working at the concierge desk of a hotel. She used to attend boarding school, and one day a former peer reaches out to her about a teacher there she says abused both of them. Vanessa doesn’t see it that way, though. The man, a then-42-year-old named Jacob Strane, loved her, and she loved him. What her peer sees as abuse, Vanessa sees as her life’s great love story. The novel goes back and forth between timelines, giving readers Vanessa’s point of view as a teen and an adult. First-time novelist Kate Elizabeth Russell beautifully captures the way Vanessa must reinterpret her past and come to terms with her life. My Dark Vanessa is one of the best books I’ve read so far in 2020. It’s one I’ll be thinking about for a long time.

Eight perfect murders book cover

Eight Perfect Murders by Peter Swanson

Malcolm co-owns and manages a bookstore that sells mysteries. Soon he’s thrust into the middle of his own when an FBI agent comes into his store and starts asking him questions about a list he posted online. Years earlier, Malcolm published a blog post on the bookstore’s website that listed eight perfect murders from various books. The FBI agent suspects someone is using Malcolm’s list to kill and wants his help. Peter Swanson has delivered another great mystery with this book, which is perfect for fans of thrillers and suspense stories. This novel is such a fun, twisted, and exciting book, and an ideal choice if you need a good distraction right about now.

Then she was gone book cover

Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell

One day, fifteen-year-old Ellie was walking to the library, but never came home. Ten years later, her family is still trying to pick up the pieces, desperate for answers about what happened to her. In an effort to move on, her mom, Laurel, starts a new relationship with Floyd, a charming man who quickly sweeps her off her feet. But the more Laurel gets to know Floyd and his young daughter, the more questions she has about what really happened to Ellie. Then She Was Gone is a fine book, but it’s my least favorite Lisa Jewell novel so far. I saw the ending coming and wasn’t entirely satisfied with how the story wrapped up.

Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

I’ve been a fan of Matt Haig since I read his memoir Reasons to Stay Alive. I love that book and think it should be required reading for anyone struggling with anxiety and depression. In this follow-up, Haig talks about what it’s like to live in a world that’s continually provoking anxiety. People are more connected than ever, yet loneliness is still a huge problem. We have more options today than we’ve ever had before, but that much freedom can provoke plenty of worries. Haig’s short chapters and helpful lists give readers a lot to think about, and his vulnerability in sharing his own mental health struggles is refreshing and appreciated.

Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee
by Casey Cep

Furious Hours is divided into three parts: the story of the alleged serial murderer and fraudster Reverend Willie Maxwell, the trial against Maxwell’s eventual killer, and Harper Lee’s attempt to chronicle these stories in the long-awaited follow-up to To Kill a Mockingbird. Each part is interesting, but I think the book could have been a bit shorter. Casey Cep is a great writer who provides a lot of detail, and I didn’t think all of those details were necessary to the overall story she’s trying to tell. Still, Furious Hours is a fascinating book that’s perfect for true-crime lovers who are also interested in American literature.

What I Loved

All I can say in this time of great distress is thank God for streaming services that fill me with endless entertainment and stories of people who are crazier than I thought anyone could ever be.

The McMillions docuseries on HBO is an excellent fraud story, and I’m convinced that Doug, the FBI agent, needs his own show.

Like nearly everyone else in the world, I watched and was amazed by Netflix’s Tiger King. I listened to the podcast version of this story, but seeing these characters come to life onscreen was certainly an experience I won’t soon forget. Some of those images are seared into my mind forever.

Schitt’s Creek is one of my favorite discoveries so far this year. I love love love this show and have already watched several episodes multiple times. I will never get tired of Moira and David on my television screen.

I was not expecting how tense I’d feel while watching a baking show, but when a custard doesn’t set or a tiered cake comes crashing down, part of me withers and dies inside. In spite of that, The Great British Baking Show is exactly the kind of entertainment I need right now.


What did you read and love in March? What should I read and watch next? Let me know in the comments! Stay safe and healthy.