On Losing School Librarians

Photo by green ant on Unsplash

Last Thursday, I found out that all of the librarians in my school district had been laid off. I’ve been a library clerk in this district for nearly eight years and had no clue this was coming. I still haven’t heard if I have a job next year or, if I do, how that job will change in light of these recent developments. The district claims school libraries will remain open and that students will continue to have access to books and other resources. If we clerks get to keep our jobs, books will be cataloged, processed, circulated, and repaired just like they are now. But elementary students will no longer have stories read to them each week. Middle school students will no longer have a librarian to hand them that perfect book that would make them feel a little less alone, a little less awkward. High school teachers will lose classroom collaborators and students will lose the person who knows just what database they need to use for their assignment. The library is the heart of some schools, and with librarians gone, that will be compromised.

Like so many issues, this one boils down to money. (I should note that teachers and other staff members have been laid off, too.) Logically, I realize that when schools are forced to make cuts, keeping teachers is their priority, as it should be. Having teachers in the classroom is an obvious necessity. Still, it saddens me to know that some people see librarians as disposable. I want librarians to be essential in every school and for others to see their work as crucial to student success.

I’ve asked many questions over these past few days, such as:

  • Do librarians not promote themselves and their work enough to be appreciated and given credit?
  • Do people believe that librarians only check books in and out all day?
  • If school administrators value student literacy, how can they get rid of the people who are experts on the subject?

I can’t answer these questions, and even if I could, I doubt I’d be satisfied. People I care about would still be laid off, programs I’ve seen flourish would still come to a halt, and students who need librarians would still be without them. Other than contacting my state legislators and asking for more funding, there’s not much I can do in the face of the school district’s decision. I can keep talking about libraries, though. I can tell people about the little kids who stop at my desk and tell me how much they love coming to the library each week. I’m happy to share stories about energetic classes who become silent when a librarian reads them a great story or focuses their attention with a fun, hands-on project.

If you too love libraries and appreciate librarians, speak up! Show your support, whether or not jobs are on the line. When you notice a librarian who’s doing great work, spread the word. Use your public library and vote for library bonds. Enthusiasm is contagious, and while it’s not enough to make up for budget shortfalls, it certainly can’t hurt. If you believe librarians matter, do what you can to spread that message.

Why I Love Public Libraries

Photo by Michael D Beckwith on Unsplash

I’ve worked in libraries for over thirteen years, but I’ve been a library patron for as long as I can remember. Some of my earliest memories are of the public library where my mom took me to pick out books. My love for the library has always been strong so working there seemed obvious.

That love is still there, so today I want to talk about why I love libraries so much. As technology and society have evolved, so have libraries, and they have a plethora of goodness to offer their communities. I know that firsthand, and I hope you do, too.

Libraries are for everyone.

This phrase became more common after these beautifully designed posters started making the rounds online. I used some in the school library where I work and saw them in the public library where I also work. The message the posters send is essential. How many other places can people go and sit inside for as long as they’d like without having to spend any money? How many other places strive to have something to offer to babies, senior citizens, and everyone in between? Good libraries try to reach everyone in their community, regardless of the barriers some people might find elsewhere.

Libraries provide opportunities
to discover and learn.

My public library has offered free classes about dancing, yoga, finance, painting, and more. They’ve hosted concerts, artists, and poetry readings. Our collection provides material by creators who disagree emphatically on just about everything. Patrons can check out tickets to museums, the symphony, and can even take home a large telescope. There are still books on the shelves, too, about any subject you can imagine. Libraries offer people the chance to find new writers, hobbies, interests, and passions. I’ll never get tired of talking about that.

Libraries meet people where they are and help them go farther.

One of the best services my library provides is called Book a Librarian. This service is an option for people who just got a new Kindle but have no idea how to use it. It’s an option for people who need to type a resume but don’t know anything about Word. Basically, if you don’t know something but want to know something, you can make an appointment for uninterrupted one-on-one time with a librarian who will teach you. How great is that?

Libraries help bridge
economic gaps.

I’ve read many articles over the past couple of years about libraries doing away with fines so that there are fewer barriers for people who need the library most of all. It’s encouraging to know that public libraries offer the same number of checkouts to patrons regardless of their bank account. Food for Fines is another way libraries help people in need. During a select timeframe, patrons have the option to pay off their fines with canned goods instead of cash. The food goes to a local food bank, and the fees are waived. This helps the patron, of course, but it also helps people in need who might not ever visit the library.


There’s so much more I could say, but these topics are nearest to my heart at the moment. Why do you love your library? What services are your favorites?


If you’re as library-obsessed as I am, you might like these posts:


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