5 Creepy Classics

Photo by Ehud Neuhaus on Unsplash

Autumn: a time for apple picking, corn mazes, costume parties, and horror films. I dislike all of those things, however, so my autumnal joy comes elsewhere, mostly from cardigans, pumpkin-flavored everything, and books. I like reading mysteries, thrillers, and horror-adjacent books all year long, but my desire to spend time with those genres intensifies in the fall. Today I want to share some of my favorite spooky books, specifically five of my favorite creepy classics.

Mulder: Do you think I'm spooky?
No, I don’t. I love you so much, Mulder.

Frankenstein book cover

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

When I was assigned Frankenstein in college, I was unexcited. Nothing about the book sounded like something I’d like. But because I am a rule-follower to the max, not reading the book wasn’t an option. Much to my surprise, I ended up genuinely enjoying this classic tale of identity, loneliness, and revenge. Though I was dreading this book based on the monster and sci-fi aspects, the heart of the story is about basic human emotion and desire. Frankenstein was first published in 1818, yet its themes are as timely as ever. If you’re skeptical of this book like I was, give it a try. I bet it will surprise you.

The lottery book cover

“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

As I read “The Lottery,” I had one of those moments when I thought I’d misread something: Is this what I think it is? Is this really happening? It was indeed happening, and because of this story’s profound darkness, it’s one that has stayed with me. When I read a short story that holds so much in so few words, I’m always amazed at the writer’s skill. Shirley Jackson is no exception. Her other work is high up on my TBR. (I’m not the biggest fan of graphic novels, but this book by Jackson’s grandson is very well done.)

The picture of Dorian Gray book cover

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Because I do judge books by their covers sometimes, I bought The Picture of Dorian Gray due to its beauty, not because I was desperate to read it. (Which I now realize fits nicely with this book’s plot.) I don’t remember what made me finally move from staring at the book to finally reading the book, but I’m grateful for whatever inspired me. This story of a man’s self-obsession and self-preservation is fascinating, disturbing, and maybe a little too relatable in my selfish moments. Wilde tells a haunting story of destruction from the inside out.

The stepford wives book cover

The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin

The Stepford Wives is another book I read in college thanks to my theories and fictions of the women’s movement class. Along with reading pieces by Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, and Audre Lord, we read a few novels, including this one. This book is about perfect wives and mothers and the cost of that perfection. Most classics are classics because they have timeless themes, and this book could spark a conversation right now that’s as relevant as ever.

The monk book cover

The Monk by Matthew Lewis

I wrote about this book before, but it’s too good not to mention again. Here’s what I said then:

This gothic novel is difficult to summarize. There’s a monk, of course, named Ambrosio. There’s a woman and/or demon who tempts him. Eventually, Ambrosio sells his soul to the Devil, which is never a good move, in my opinion. In the NoveList description of this book, they call it “an extravagant blend of sex, death, politics, Satanism, and poetry.”

If that’s not enough to get you reading, I don’t know what more I can say.


Do you find yourself reaching for books like these come fall? What are some of your favorite creepy classics? I’d love more titles to add to my list.

Top Five Friday: Classics I Failed to Finish

I’ve been an avid reader since birth (well, almost.) I know I read more than the average person. I have an English degree that required me to study everything from Beowulf to Zadie Smith. If there was an Olympics for reading, I might not be Michael Phelps, but I’d like to think I’d at least get a bronze medal or two.

In spite of my self-bestowed status as an Olympian reader, there are many classics that I have tried and failed to read.  Today I want to share five of them and briefly explain why they weren’t for me. Keep reading and behold my literary failures.

ulysses

Ulysses by James Joyce

Bless my precious heart for thinking this book couldn’t possibly be as daunting as people said. (It is.) Goodreads says this book is “a major achievement in 20th-century literature.” Even so, it’s just not for me.  I admire Joyce’s creativity, risk-taking, and lasting contribution to literature, but I think I only made it ten pages before closing the book and putting it back on the shelf.

One of my college classmates did read Ulysses in its entirety. I still remember him and think in a Chris Traeger voice, “Way to go, buddy. Way to go.”

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Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

I’ve always liked going to antique stores, even as a kid. When I was in middle school, I was in an antique store with my parents and found a beautiful copy of Pride and Prejudice. I decided to get it and read it. I did get it, but read it? Not so much. I tried, though. I’ve picked up this book at least five times and wanted to read it, but I just can’t make myself finish it. I can’t get into it at all. That didn’t stop me from buying another copy of it, though. I had to have the A in the Drops Caps collection. I tried reading that edition, thinking my brain might be tricked by the new cover, but no. I still can’t do it. Kathleen Kelly would be so disappointed in me.

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Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

If you weren’t upset enough that I don’t like Pride and Prejudice, I’m sure you’ll be thrilled to know I don’t like Little Women, either. I made it about 100 pages into this book (which is way farther than I’ve ever made it in P & P) but I lost interest and couldn’t make myself finish it. I own a beautiful edition of this book, so I keep it around for its looks, but I’m just not into its personality. Sorry, Louisa.

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Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding

To earn my English degree, I had to take and pass a comprehensive exam. The reading list was lengthy, including novels, poems, plays, and stories. I honestly don’t remember much that was on the list, but I remember this book. I am an avid rule-follower, so I did my assigned reading. I wasn’t the student who would just use SparkNotes and hope for the best. But as I read Joseph Andrews, I actually said out loud, “I hate you, book.” I briefly turned into a rebel and didn’t finish the book, but I passed the exam anyway. Joseph and I were never meant to be.

middlemarch

Middlemarch by George Eliot

I hear Middlemarch come up all the time in people’s lists of favorite books, so it’s the only title on my list that I want to try again someday. I read quite a bit of this one and was really into it when I first started, but I lost interest around the halfway point. I’m not quite sure why, but I just didn’t care enough to go another 400 or so pages. Maybe the timing was wrong. I promise I’ll come back to you someday, George Eliot.


What are the classics that haunt you? What are the ones you just couldn’t force yourself to finish?