What I Read and Loved in September 2021

Photo by Debby Hudson on Unsplash

I love September. Fall slowly begins its arrival, school resumes, I light my apple-scented candles, and my cardigans find their way back into my closet. This September had all of that plus some great reading. Here’s what I read and loved this past month.

What I Read

People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry
Format: Print

Poppy and Alex have been best friends since college. Once a year, they take a vacation together until something happens during one trip that drives the two apart. They reconnect after two years, and Poppy is desperate to rekindle her friendship with Alex. She plans one last trip and asks Alex to come along. He says yes, and the two are forced to confront what went wrong and how to move forward. 

People We Meet on Vacation is such a sweet, feel-good love story without being too sweet. The characters are well developed, something that’s essential to my literary happiness, no matter how good a plot might be. I liked spending time with Poppy and Alex and feel eager to pick up another book by Emily Henry. 

Hacking School Libraries: 10 Ways to Incorporate Library Media Centers into Your Learning Community  by Kristina A. Holzweiss and Stony Evans
Format: Print

This book is a quick read that offers many ideas for school library staff to market their collection, further literacy in their building, and increase their number of library patrons. I appreciated how many of the authors’ ideas were attainable. I’ve read many articles and essays over the years that offer great suggestions that just so happen to cost a whole lot of money. Hacking School Libraries provides more straightforward and cost-effective ideas that still increase student and staff engagement.

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney
Format: Print

Sally Rooney’s latest novel concerns itself with four friends: Alice, Eileen, Felix, and Simon. They’re a group of Dubliners around 30 who are still trying to figure out their lives. Some chapters are letters between best friends Alice and Eileen, while others explore the relationships between the women and men. There’s not much plot in this novel, but Rooney’s prose and characterizations are so lovely that I’m just fine with that. This novel beautifully explores themes of friendship, sex, religion, and adulthood.

I’d been looking forward to this book for months, and it didn’t disappoint. Beautiful World, Where Are You isn’t for everyone, but give this one a chance if you like beautiful writing and don’t mind stories with a slow burn. (Plus, that cover is so pretty!)

Goldenrod by Maggie Smith
Format: Print

I don’t usually rush to the bookstore for poetry releases, but I made my way to my local indie to pick up Goldenrod the week it was released. I’ve liked Maggie Smith’s work since her poem “Good Bones” went viral a few years ago. Goldenrod is filled with more poems that pack as much punch as that one does, exploring themes of marriage and motherhood. 

One of my favorite poetry-reading experiences is when I read a line or two that are like a gut punch. I love it when a poet can string words and images together in a way that makes me pause and shake my head. I had several of those moments reading Smith’s newest book. 

Little Secrets by Jennifer Hillier
Format: eBook

Marin and Derek are attractive, successful, and wealthy. Their lives seem perfect until the day their little boy is kidnapped. Unbeknownst to her husband, Marin hires a private investigator to help find the boy after the FBI turns up zero leads. The investigator calls Marin with news one day, but it’s about Derek, not her son. Derek is having an affair, and Marin must stop it. 

I’ve mentioned before on this site that @things.i.bought.and.liked is one of my favorite Instagram follows because of her exceptional beauty, home, and lifestyle recommendations. It turns out she also has good taste in reading. She recommended this book, and I’m so glad she did. Little Secrets is packed full of twists and turns, making this a thriller I couldn’t put down. 

What I Loved

TELEVISION: Only Murders in the Building

Hulu’s Only Murders in the Building is an absolute delight. This smart, funny, and suspenseful show is about a trio of misfits who live in the Arconia, a beautiful NYC apartment building. They come together over their shared love of a popular podcast and decide to start their own when one of their neighbors is murdered.

I’ve loved Steve Martin and Martin Short for a long time, so I knew I’d like this show, but it surpassed my expectations. Selena Gomez rounds out the cast perfectly with her wit and dry humor.

TELEVISION: The Chair

The Chair is about an English department at a struggling liberal arts college. Sandra Oh has just become the new department chair and wants to change the school’s culture. As with any TV show, things don’t go according to plan. Jay Duplass is fantastic as Oh’s fellow professor, friend, and love interest. Holland Taylor should be handed her Emmy right now for her excellent portrayal of a Chaucer scholar whose office has just been moved underneath the gym. The Chair is immensely entertaining, but it also has important things to say about gender, cancel culture, and academia. 

What I Wrote


That’s all for me! What did you read and love in September?

What I Read and Loved in February 2021

Photo by madeleine ragsdale on Unsplash

I think I say this every month, but February flew by. I can’t say I minded, though, considering how stressful things still are thanks to the pandemic. Students at my high schools came back to in-person learning on March 1, so February was full of meetings and emails about what that was going to look like.

I only read three books last month, two of which are quite short. Since I had so much information coming at me from work, my brain needed a bit of a break. Keep on reading to see what those books were and to know what else I enjoyed. Thanks for coming by my little space on the internet!

What I Read

The truths we hold book cover

The Truths We Hold: An American Journey by Kamala Harris
FORMAT: Audiobook

I’m always wary of reading political memoirs from people currently in office. I assume their books are going to be more policy-driven than story-driven. Despite my reservations, I enjoyed this book. There is a lot of policy talk in The Truths We Hold, but Harris does a lovely job telling her story. My favorite parts of the book include stories of her mother and sister and what their lives were like as Harris grew up. Seeing how her mother shaped her was touching. Harris reads the audiobook, which is a major plus for me. 

How to make a slave and other essays book cover

How to Make a Slave and Other Essays by Jerald Walker
FORMAT: Print

I love a good essay collection, and this book is exactly that. Jerald Walker talks about his life as a Black man in America with wisdom, humor, and a keen eye for a good story. I’m drawn to books set in academia, so my favorite essays in this collection are the ones that discuss Walker’s life as a student and professor. The essay in which he discusses his writing mentor James Alan McPherson is especially fantastic.

I am the rage book cover

I Am the Rage by Dr. Martina McGowan
FORMAT: Print

Whenever I do a pick-up order at Target, I browse the app to see what new books they have on their shelves. That was how I discovered this poetry collection. (Isn’t it great that a big-box store like Target sells poetry?!) This book was the perfect reading choice for Black History Month since McGowan’s poems have racial justice as their core. The poems in this book were written in the last year, so there are mentions of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd. Those modern connections made this slim volume a powerful read.

What I Loved

ONLINE SHOP: The Bluest Willow

As I’ve mentioned before in this section, I’m a big fan of the Popcast with Knox and Jamie. I discovered the Bluest Willow because the shop’s owner is Knox’s wife, Ashley McCoy. This shop has the cutest clothing, accessories, and home decor items. I’ve done several orders already and absolutely love all the pieces I’ve received. Ashley has curated such a lovely collection of unique yet everyday goods. I love this little shop so much.

RECIPE: One Skillet Saucy Chicken Tortilla Enchilada Rice Bake
from Half Baked Harvest

Look at this picture of gooey cheese and sauce and tortilla chips and flavorful goodness. LOOK AT IT. This recipe is as delicious as it appears, and also pretty simple. I made my own enchilada sauce, but this would be even easier if you used pre-made sauce. I’ve loved many Half Baked Harvest recipes, but this one might be my new favorite.


What did you read and love in February?

What I Read and Loved in January 2021

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

I know nothing miraculous happens when the calendar changes from one year to another, but going from 2020 to 2021 felt especially exciting and vital. Of course, the hard stuff is still hard, and the good stuff is still good, but any forward motion right now fills me with optimism.

Despite being in a weird headspace (who isn’t right now?), I surprised myself by reading five books. I enjoyed all of them, too! Keep reading to learn why.

What I Read

Luster book cover

Luster by Raven Leilani

This book got a lot of buzz in 2020, and after reading it, I can see why. The prose is gorgeous and effectively puts readers in the head of the book’s protagonist, a 23-year-old Black woman living in New York City. She’s a struggling artist whose work life and dating life are both disappointing. When Eric, an older man in an open marriage, comes along, she begins an affair with him. What was once secretive and alluring becomes something else altogether when Eric’s wife and daughter become tangled in the affair.

I appreciate a lot about this book, but there’s a major plot point that didn’t make sense to me. Still, Luster is worth reading. If nothing else, it made me thankful my 20s are behind me.

The look of the book book cover

The Look of the Book: Jackets, Covers, and Art at the Edges of Literature by Peter Mendelsund and David J. Alworth

If you’re like me and you judge books by their covers, this book will be a dream come true. Full of gorgeous images, Mendelsund and Alworth take you behind the scenes of publishing, graphic design, and how the two merge. I read this on my iPad, but would love to purchase a copy so I can flip through it when I’m craving some eye candy. The Look of the Book is a must-read for the nerdiest of book nerds.

Chefs fridges book cover

Chefs’ Fridges: More Than 35 World-Renowned Cooks Reveal What They Eat at Home by Carrie Solomon

One of my life mottos is to mind my own business. I’m not going to ask to see inside your refrigerator, but I’ll happily take a look if you want me to. The chefs in this book wanted me to, and I was thrilled to oblige.

Over the past couple of years, I’ve developed a passion for food and cooking, and passion is on every page of Chefs’ Fridges. This book is full of incredible chefs and great, bright photos. Do I have the palate of an 8-year-old child? Yes, I do. But while I might not want to eat it, I can appreciate a well-told story about frozen rabbit and why someone believes it’s delicious.

The survivors book cover

The Survivors by Jane Harper

Jane Harper is one of my must-read authors. I’ve enjoyed each of her books, and The Survivors is no exception. The story is once again set in Australia and follows a man named Kiernan when he ventures back to his hometown with his family. Soon into his arrival, someone is found dead on the beach, and the death raises questions and forces Kiernan to face his role in terrible accident years earlier.

While I didn’t like The Survivors as much as Harper’s other novels, I still enjoyed the story a lot, though the beginning was a bit slow. Nevertheless, fans of Harper’s mysteries will be more than satisfied with this gripping story about a man forced to face his past.

The residence book cover

The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House
by Kate Andersen Brower

You might have noticed that the US got a new president on January 20th. Because I love presidential history, I told someone that Inauguration Day is my Super Bowl, and I meant it. Since I had politics on my mind, I decided to read one of the books I got for Christmas, The Residence. In its pages are stories from White House staff who work behind the scenes. Readers hear from butlers, maids, chefs, florists, and many others. The pride they take in their jobs is inspiring, and the devotion to the families they serve is admirable. If you too are into history and want a quick, fun read, make sure to pick up The Residence.

What I Loved

POEM: “The Hill We Climb” by Amanda Gorman

I can’t imagine anyone witnessing Gorman’s reading and not being moved by it. Her words and performance were powerful reminders that art matters.

INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT: Sharon Says So

Sometimes I feel as if I’m wasting my time when I scroll through Instagram. Other times I’m learning about the Constitution and impeachment trials. That’s all thanks to my favorite new Instagram follow, Sharon Says So a.k.a. Sharon McMahon. She’s a former government teacher who’s bringing her wisdom to the masses. One of the features I love most on her account is when she asks for opinions on hot topics. She gives people on the right, left, and middle a chance to speak their minds on controversial issues and shares some of their answers. It’s helpful to see how other people think and why they believe what they do. And in a world full of people screaming at each other about politics, it’s incredibly refreshing to witness civil and helpful discourse.


What did you read and love in January? Leave a comment and let me know!

What I Read and Loved in September 2020

I barely remember September. It’s only October 10th as I write this, yet September seems so long ago. I was a different person then, young and naive. So much is happening every day that it’s difficult to keep track of it all. Despite my current headspace, I read seven books in September. It was a great reading month and I’m excited to share it with you.

What I Read

Grand Union book cover

Grand Union by Zadie Smith

In August, I read Zadie Smith’s latest book, a small collection of essays called Intimations. Reading that reminded me how great a writer Smith is, so I was eager to read something else. I have several of her books on my shelf at the moment, but Grand Union was the one that caught my eye. This book is her first collection of short stories. Like most story collections, there are some hits and misses, but overall, I thoroughly enjoyed these stories. Zadie Smith is such a brilliant writer; her fiction is unlike anything else I’ve read. 

Musical chairs book cover

Musical Chairs by Amy Poeppel

A trope I often enjoy in novels is a family coming together on a vacation or second home. That plot is exactly what Musical Chairs provides. The protagonist is Bridget, a New Yorker and musician who has a family home in Connecticut. She plans to spend the summer there with her boyfriend, but he breaks up with her first. Instead of the romantic summer she envisioned, Bridget is suddenly grappling with a broken heart, her grown children coming back home, her elderly father’s sudden engagement, and her fledgling career as part of the Forsyth Trio. This novel is full of interesting characters, including Bridget’s best friend and fellow musician Will. Musical Chairs is a delightful novel that made me eager to read more from Amy Poeppel. 

Let's pretend this never happened book cover

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir
by Jenny Lawson

This book is a memoir in essays about Jenny Lawson’s life growing up with mental illness in a small town with a quirky family. That summary sounds right up my alley, but this book didn’t work for me for some reason. I know Lawson is a beloved writer, but I just never connected with what she was saying. I listened to this book, so maybe I would have enjoyed it more in print.

Transcendent kingdom book cover

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

As soon as I finished Homegoing, Yaa Gyasi’s debut novel, I was eager to get my hands on her second. I had to wait a while, but Transcedent Kingdom is worth the wait. The story is about a young woman named Gifty, who’s studying neuroscience and living in California. She’s focusing on the brain and addiction, an interest that was sparked when her older brother overdosed as a teen. Her complicated family also includes a God-fearing mother who is barely functioning through the fog of depression of grief. When she comes to California, Gifty has to confront her past, her trauma, and her thoughts about religion. This novel is a slow burn, and I loved every minute. 

Good talk book cover

Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations by Mira Jacob

I’ve only read a handful of graphic novels. I enjoyed them, but find that graphic novels just aren’t my thing. I might need to reevaluate that, though. Despite not being drawn to the format very often, there was something about Good Talk that made me pick it up. I’m glad I did because it’s fantastic. I couldn’t put it down. Good Talk is about how Mira Jacob–a first-generation American–addresses race and injustice issues during conversations with her little boy. That sounds heavy, and it certainly is at times, but this book is also funny and sweet. 

Imperfect women book cover

Imperfect Women by Araminta Hall

Nancy, Eleanor, and Mary have been friends since they met at Oxford years ago. Nancy is beautiful, wealthy, and is cheating on her husband, a secret only Eleanor knows. Eleanor is single, throwing herself into relief work. Mary is married and drowning in the responsibilities of raising children and caring for a sick husband. When Nancy is murdered, her friends are left shattered and scared. Imperfect Women is a good thriller. I enjoyed its focus on female friendship. I don’t think it’s a book that will stay with me very long, but it’s certainly worth reading if you need something suspenseful.

Sigh, gone book cover

Sigh, Gone: A Misfit’s Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock, and the Fight to Fight In by Phuc Tran

Sigh, Gone is a total delight. Phuc Tran takes us through his childhood and teen years through the lens of classic books. He and his family immigrated to the US in the 1970s, leaving Vietnam behind. Tran’s English is better than his Vietnamese. He loves punk rock and Albert Camus. His parents can spoil him in some moments and wound him deeply in others. The stories in this book range from hilarious to heartbreaking and back again. I thoroughly enjoyed this memoir and would recommend the audio version. The author reads it himself, which makes the whole story feel even more authentic.

What I Loved

Ted Lasso poster

TELEVISION: Ted Lasso

There are many things in 2020 that I didn’t see coming. Among them is my love of a show about a soccer coach. Jason Sudeikis is brilliant as Ted Lasso, a kind and big-hearted football coach from Kansas who ends up coaching soccer in England. I laugh out loud during each episode of this show, but the series is unique because of its heart. In a time when there is so much sadness in the world, watching Ted Lasso is a welcome much-needed reprieve from reality that leaves me feeling warm and fuzzy every time I watch.

Reply All logo

PODCAST: Reply All

Reply All has been on my radar for a long time, but I only recently started listening to it. All I knew about the show was that it’s about the internet. That didn’t sound especially interesting, but now I’m officially hooked. The show is about the internet, sure, but it’s so much more than that. The first episode I listened to was #166, A Country of Liars. It’s all about Q-Anon and how that conspiracy theory began. My favorite episode so far–and one of the best podcast episodes I’ve ever heard–is episode #158, The Case of the Missing Hit, in which the hosts help find a phantom song for a listener. I’m late to the party on this podcast, but I’m glad I’m here now. 

Get organized with the home edit photo

TELEVISION: Get Organized with the Home Edit

As you know, 2020 has been. . .not great. I’ve needed some escapism lately, and I found it in a show where I watch women organize pantries and closets. Like any self-respecting organization lover, I’ve followed the Home Edit on Instagram for a long time, so I was eager when I heard they had a Netflix show. I didn’t know that what I needed right now was to see Khloe Kardashian’s garage get a makeover, but apparently, that was just what the doctor ordered.


That’s it for me! What did you read and love in September?

What I Read and Loved in August 2020

Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

Even though it’s only September 7th, it feels like August was months ago. Time feels stranger than ever in this COVID-19 world. I spent most of August wondering if I’d still have a job since my school district is starting the year doing virtual-only classes. Thankfully, I’m still employed, and after I knew that for sure, I was so excited to get back to work. It’s strange without the students there, but I now have a lot of time to get tasks done that I never had time to do before. Silver linings!

And now for the good stuff. Keep reading to see what I read and loved in August.

What I Read

The lazy genius way book cover

The Lazy Genius Way: Embrace What Matters, Ditch What Doesn’t, and Get Stuff Done by Kendra Adachi

I’ve been a fan of Kendra and her Lazy Genius podcast for a long time, so I was eager to get my hands on this book. I had high expectations, yet Kendra managed to exceed all of them. The Lazy Genius Way is not a typical self-help book or organizational guide. It doesn’t have lists of what you need to be doing or formulas for a perfect home. Instead, Kendra guides you to living your best life through 13 principles that you can customize for your own needs. That customization is what sets this book apart from others like it. After reading this book, I sent a copy to a dear friend and mom of three kids. My copy is currently in my mom’s hands. The three of us are in entirely different stages of our lives, but each of us finds the book helpful and encouraging. Do yourself a favor and pick this up ASAP. I’ve underlined every other sentence, and you probably will too. 

Hamilton: the revolutions book cover

Hamilton: The Revolution
by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter

As you know if you read last month’s recap post, I watched and immediately became obsessed with Hamilton. This book helped me during my Hamilton hangover and is a must-read for fans of the acclaimed musical. The book contains beautiful photos and behind the scenes essays, but my favorite part is Lin-Manuel Miranda’s notes for each song. I loved getting to peek inside his head and see what he thought as he wrote the most iconic musical of our time.

Intimations book cover

Intimations by Zadie Smith

It had been a long time since I’d read anything by Zadie Smith, and this slim essay collection seemed like a must-read. Smith wrote each essay during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. Reading this reminded me of just how brilliant Smith is and how I need to read more of her work. (Which I did! Thoughts on that next month.)

The bright lands book cover

The Bright Lands by John Fram

I placed a copy of The Bright Lands on hold at the library as soon as I heard about it. The plot–a high school football star in small-town Texas goes missing, and his brother comes back from NYC to investigate–intrigued me. When I picked up the book, I realized that my library had categorized it in the horror section. I started reading and wondered why. Then the last few chapters came, and it all made sense. I enjoyed the first three-quarters of this novel, but the last part was far too violent and scary for my taste. I had to skim the last quarter of the book and wasn’t satisfied with the conclusion.

What Will Soon Take Place by Tania Runyan

Before finishing this book, it had been two years since I’d read a poetry collection. As I mentioned above, August had its fair share of stress, and I find it hard to read sometimes when I feel overwhelmed. I thought a volume of poetry might be just what I needed, and it was. Tania Runyan is one of my favorite contemporary poets. Her work combines religion and meditations on daily life in a way that is profound yet wholly relatable to me. What Will Soon Take Place is a look at the book of Revelation. Several lines throughout Runyan’s poems felt like gut-punches. Not only did I love this collection, but it inspired me to read poetry more often. 

What I Loved

The morning show poster featuring Jennifer Aniston, Steve Carrell, and Reese Witherspoon

TELEVISION: The Morning Show

I’d heard mixed reviews for this show, and while I understand some of the criticisms, it provided a much welcome TV binge. Jennifer Aniston and Billy Crudup are great in this show, and the finale left me eager for season two.

TECHNOLOGY: Apple AirPods

My Macbook was starting misbehave, so I looked up some of its issues on Apple’s website. According to them, my beloved 8-year-old computer was “vintage.” Ouch. I needed a new one. Thankfully, Apple was running a great deal for students and school staff that included a new Macbook at a reduced price that came with a free pair of AirPods. I would never pay $150.00 for AirPods, but I was certainly not opposed to a free pair. It turns out that if I ever lose these, I might pay $150.00 for AirPods after all. I love these little things so much. I’ve had other Bluetooth headphones and earbuds before, but none have worked as well or have sounded as good as these do. They sync to my phone automatically and hold a charge for a long time. My AirPods aren’t noise-canceling, but that’s good for when I’m wearing these at work. I like that I can still hear when people are trying to get my attention. As you’ll see below, I’ve been listening to many podcasts, so my AirPods and I have become very close in a short amount of time.

PODCAST: The Bible Binge

The Bible Binge is a podcast from the folks who host the Popcast, a podcast about pop culture that I never miss. The Bible Binge looks at stories from the Bible and the hosts–Knox McCoy and Jamie Golden–recap those stories as if they were movies or TV shows. The show was seasonal but has recently changed to a weekly format with two additional episode types. One is called Favored or Forsaken, in which the hosts discuss religious topics in the news. The most recent episode discusses Jerry Fallwell, Jr. and Christian colleges, and it is [insert fire emoji here]. The other new episode format is hosted by a gem of Instagram and resident Bible Scholar Erin Moon. In Faith Adjacent episodes, Erin looks at pop culture through a biblical lens to see what spiritual truths we can take away from cultural icons. Her first episode was about Hamilton, and I devoured every word. If you’re interested in a smart and funny look at how faith intersects with modern culture, don’t miss this show. 

PODCAST: The Lazy Genius

As I said, I’ve been a fan of this podcast for a while. A couple of episodes were August-specific favorites, though. One episode is called How to Lazy Genius Anything. In this episode, Kendra takes an issue and walks through how to resolve the problem and make it better. The other episode I loved is How to Make the Perfect Playlist. I’d wanted to get back into music more but was overwhelmed with where to begin. I took Kendra’s advice in this episode and started making some new playlists, and they have given me so much joy. My favorite one is linked here. 

That’s it for me! What did you read and love in August?