What I Read and Loved in April 2020

Photo by the Bialons on Unsplash

I feel as if I aged about five years in April. I intended to be far more productive than I actually was, but I figured that if there was ever a time to slack off, it was during a worldwide pandemic. Instead of saying I’m a teensy bit lazy, I prefer saying that I’m treating myself with grace. And I’m doing that by reading a lot (and also buying stuff from Sephora). I finished eight books in April and enjoyed each of them. Keep reading to see what else I loved last month. You probably don’t have anything better to do right now.

What I Read

The body double book cover

The Body Double by Emily Beyda

The nameless narrator of The Body Double is living in a small town and working in a movie theater. Her life changes when a mysterious stranger approaches her and makes her an offer. In exchange for hundreds of thousands of dollars, she will leave behind every single facet of her current life, move to Los Angeles, and live as the body double for Rosanna, a famous starlet who has suffered a breakdown. She agrees, vowing to cut all ties to her current world. 

This book is eerie, strange, and unsettling. It’s a page-turner, yet it has a slower burn than most thrillers. I enjoyed the commentary on Hollywood and its beauty ideals but was a bit disappointed in the ending. 

The office book cover

The Office: The Untold Story of the Greatest Sitcom of the 2000s
by Andy Greene

The Office has been one of my favorite TV shows for years, so I’d been eagerly anticipating this book. Andy Greene delivered everything I hoped for and more. The book is written as an oral history, and we hear from all the cast members, writers, producers, crew, and many others. If you’re a fan of The Office, you’ll enjoy hearing its origin story and getting to see behind the scenes.

Adequate yearly progress book cover

Adequate Yearly Progress by Roxanna Elden

Adequate Yearly Progress is one of those books that I judged by the cover. It caught my eye, and when I read the back and learned it was a satirical story set in a suburban high school, I had to read it. The cast of characters is diverse and always entertaining. There’s an overwhelmed principal who is suddenly thrust into the spotlight after an awkward encounter with the new superintendent. A history teacher is writing a secret blog in which she seems to have it together far more than she actually does. A spoken-word poet tries and fails to connect with her students in a meaningful way. The football coach can be there for his players but has no idea how to be a father. There’s more depth to this novel than you might expect. Teachers and school staff will especially enjoy this gem.

Dark places book cover

Dark Places by Gillian Flynn

In this strange season, my attention span comes and goes depending on how I’m feeling. I was in the mood to read one day but knew I had to find a book that would instantly hook me. I perused my shelves, saw Dark Places, and knew it was The One. This book is about Libby Day, the lone survivor of a massacre in which her mother and sisters were killed. Her brother was arrested and convicted of the crime, and she hasn’t spoken to him since. Years later, when Libby is in her 20s, she’s approached by a group of people obsessed with crimes who call themselves the Kill Club. They offer her money to come to their events, and Libby has to take them up on it since she’s nearly broke. Life begins to unravel for Libby as she’s faced with her past, and she’s forced to confront things she thought she’d buried.

As always, Gillian Flynn’s writing is gripping from the first sentence. Dark Places is indeed dark and creepy, but it came through as the unputdownable book I needed at the time.

The guest list book cover

The Guest List by Lucy Foley

There’s a small island off the coast of Ireland that’s rumored to be haunted. A couple hopes to change that, though, when they turn it into a destination wedding spot. Their first bride and groom couldn’t be more perfect. The groom is a handsome TV star, and the bride is an online magazine editor. Their wedding will be chic, expensive, and memorable. As their guests start arriving, readers experience the wedding weekend through the eyes of various characters. The bride’s sister has been through something traumatic. The best man doesn’t get the respect he craves. The wedding planner is trying to make sure the weekend goes smoothly. It doesn’t, of course, but that makes for an exciting thriller. If you liked Lucy Foley’s previous novel, The Hunting Party, you’ll like this one too, thanks to the similar construct and narrative structure.

Wow, no thank you book cover

Wow, No Thank You by Samantha Irby

After reading a couple of eerie thrillers in a row, I wanted a change of pace, and a funny essay collection seemed like just the thing. I don’t often laugh out loud when I read, but Samantha Irby changed that. Her essays are hilarious, and her voice is entirely her own. Some of these essays are pretty raunchy, but this book makes for a good “I’m quarantined and need to laugh a lot” read.

Unabrow: Misadventures of a Late Bloomer by Una LaMarche

I stayed on the funny essay path and picked up Unabrow next. It had been sitting on my shelf for years, though I don’t remember where or why I bought it. I’m glad I did, though, because it’s quite funny. Una LaMarche writes about what it’s like growing up female and the complexities that women encounter as they become wives and mothers. Unabrow is lighthearted and fun, perfect for fans of Sloane Crosley. (And what a cover, huh?)

All things reconsidered book cover

All Things Reconsidered: How Rethinking What We Know Helps Us Know What We Believe by Knox McCoy

I’ve been a Knox McCoy fan for a long time now thanks to the podcasts The Popcast and The Bible Binge that he hosts with Jamie Golden. He’s funny and thoughtful, a combination I love. All Things Reconsidered doesn’t come out until next month, but I got an advanced copy since I preordered the book. Knox covers a lot of different subjects, some of them silly and some of them deeply personal and theological. No matter the topic, his voice always comes through. If you’re a Popcast/Bible Binge fan (or just want a good book about reconsideration), mark your calendar for June 2nd and pick this up.

What I Loved

Honey grail face oil

SKINCARE: Farmacy’s Honey Grail Ultra-Hydrating Face Oil

As I said at the beginning of this post, I feel as if April aged me. To stop the ravages of time, I’ve been slathering my face with different potions, the newest of which is this oil from Farmacy. It’s thicker than the average facial oil and leaves my skin soft, even hours post-application. Can this oil help make me look 22 again? It’s certainly worth a try.

Devi from Never Have I Ever

TV: Never Have I Ever

I love Mindy Kaling and am always intrigued when she releases something new. Her newest effort is a Netflix show called Never Have I Ever. It’s about a 15-year-old Indian girl named Devi who’s growing up with her mom in California. Her dad died during her freshman year, but Devi is feisty and is determined to make her sophomore year the best yet. This show is a teen rom-com, but it’s got a surprising amount of depth, too. It’s funny, yes, but it also has its share of sincerely heartwarming moments. I loved it and can’t wait for season two.

Asian woman with a green face mask on
Photo by Arya Pratama on Unsplash

PEOPLE: Healthcare workers, janitors, delivery drivers, grocery store clerks, fast food cooks, and all the other people who are working to make our lives as normal as possible

I’m blessed that I get to work from home, but I know that’s not possible for everyone. I am incredibly grateful for the people who are on the front lines right now, the ones who are putting themselves at risk for the good of everyone else. If that’s you, thank you!


That’s it for me. What did you read and love in April? What’s getting you through this weird season we’re in? I’d love to know!

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